Get your International Prostate Symptom Score 

Prostate issues are common in men over 40 years of age. And there are many ways of dealing with the symptoms. You can use the IPSS tool to test the level of your symptoms for your own knowledge or to take and discuss the results with your health care provider.

Why take the IPSS test? Coloplast has developed an online version of the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) test. The IPSS test is validated worldwide as a means of assessing urinary symptoms. Learn more about IPSS
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Test your urinary symptoms today

Men who have an enlarged prostate may experience urinary symptoms such as a weak urine stream, the need to get up in the middle of the night to pee, and/or the feeling that they cannot fully empty their bladder – a symptom also referred to as BPH (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia). In most cases, an enlarged prostate is not dangerous nor cancer related, but it is important to have it tested and to monitor your symptoms.

 

 

Coloplast has developed an online version of the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) test. The IPSS is validated worldwide as a means of assessing urinary symptoms. Many health care providers use it every day as a diagnostic tool. Urinary symptoms can become very bothersome and if severe, medical treatment is needed.

 

 

Take the two minute test and assess the status of your urinary symptoms. If your test scores are moderate or severe, we suggest that you contact your health care provider to have further tests taken and to see if further attention or treatment is necessary. 

 

You might find it useful to use this test to your doctor appointments and use the results in discussion about your symptoms with your doctor. You and your health care provider may also decide to use the tool for self-monitoring during treatment as a way to check if symptoms are becoming less bothersome (e.g. when taking medication or after surgery).

 

 

Start the test now

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Managing bladder retention

What does it mean to have an enlarged prostate? What does it mean to have an enlarged prostate? Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a noncancerous enlargement of the prostate, which is common among men above the age of 40. What is an enlarged prostate?
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What does it mean to have an enlarged prostate?

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a noncancerous enlargement of the prostate, which is common among men above the age of 40. As the prostate gland grows in size, it may compress the urethra and restrict the flow of urine. Common symptoms of BPH include:

 

  • Constant urge (a strong sense of wanting to urinate)
  • Weak stream
  • Frequent urination
  • Urinary tract infections (UTIs)
  • Getting up multiple times in the night to urinate. 

 

In some cases there can also be urinary retention. Urinary retention (an inability to voluntarily urinate) is a serious symptom of severe BPH that requires immediate medical attention. Depending on your issue, you may need to use an intermittent catheter. The cause of BPH varies from one man to the next. Some men will never reach a symptom level where treatment is necessary, and others will suffer from severe symptoms, where medical attention is crucial. You can evaluate your symptoms here. 

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How to manage bladder retention?* How to manage bladder retention?* If you have difficulty emptying your bladder, you may use an intermittent catheter. Your first steps will be to discuss this option with your health care provider and to find one that fits your lifestyle and needs. Learn about bladder retention
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Managing bladder retention

If you have difficulty emptying your bladder, you may need to use an intermittent catheter. The first steps will be to discuss this option with your health care provider and find a product that fits your needs and your lifestyle.* 

 

If you use intermittent catheters and experience frequent urinary tract infections (UTIs), it may be a good idea to do the following:

 

  • Drink more fluid during the day
  • Increase how often you catheterize daily. Typically you will be advised to catheterize 4-6 times a day if you are not able to void by yourself.
  • Ensure you have clean hands and materials when catheterizing
  • Reassess your intermittent catheterization technique 

If you still experience UTIs despite following these guidelines, be sure to contact a health care provider.

 

*Users practicing self-catheterization should always follow the guidance of their health care provider.


 

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Suffering from a weak stream or bladder retention? What are the advantages of intermittent catheterization? Intermittent catheterization (IC) is often considered the preferred method for emptying your bladder for certain medical conditions About intermittent catheterization
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The advantages of intermittent catheterization

References

  1. Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in Adults: 2009 International Clinical Practice Guidelines from the   Infectious Diseases Society of America.  Thomas M. Hooton, Suzanne F. Bradley, Diana D. Cardenas, Richard Colgan,4Suzanne E.  Geerlings, James C. Rice,,a Sanjay Saint,3 Anthony J. Schaeffer, Paul A. Tambayh, Peter  Tenke, and Lindsay E. Nicolle  published in Urinary Catheter Guidelines • CID 2010:50 (1 March) • 625-663
  2. EAUN guidelines: S.Vahr, H.Cobussen-Boekhorst, J.Eikenboom, V.Geng, S Holroyd, M Lester, I Pearce, C. Vandewinkel. Evidence-based Guidelines for Best Practice in Urological Health Care. European Association of Urology Nurses 2013

It's important to empty your bladder regularly as prescribed by your doctor or nurse. If you cannot empty your bladder your naturally, you and your health care provider may decide that Intermittent catheterization (IC) is the right option for you. Intermittent catheterization (IC) is often considered the preferred method for emptying your bladder for certain medical conditions. The benefits of IC include:

 

  • Lower risk of complications and infections compared to indwelling catheters1
  • Allows you to empty your bladder at a convenient time and place
  • More independence and confidence and better overall quality of life2

If you are considering switching to an intermittent catheter, we recommend that you contact your health care provider. You can discuss whether an intermittent catheterization routine would be suitable for you.

 

View our intermittent catheter products

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*Users practicing self-catheterization should always follow the guidance of their health care provider.

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